Purdue marching band

The Purdue football team is lucky to have one of the best bands in the nation play at home football games. The marching bands name is the “All- American” Marching Band which originated in 1886. The funny thing about that is that the band was created a whole entire year before Purdue’s first football team. There is also a total of 389 members in the “All-American” Marching Band which makes Purdue’s band the largest standing band in the Big Ten and one of the largest in the nation.

“Our marching band is awesome they are always playing exciting music and they always have our backs,” said Defensive End for Purdue Shane Henley. ” They truly feel like a part of the team because they are just as focused in on the game as we are.”

Most people don’t know this but the marching band gets its members from people who volunteer to come out. The reason for that is because Purdue does not have a school of music so to keep the band alive and well volunteers have to come out and try out every year. During games the band can be spotted next to the student section and in the middle of the field performing before the game and during halftime.

 

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Purdue marching band

May-Mester

After Spring ball ends on April 16, 2016 after the Purdue Spring football game the players will have the option to either stay after the semester or to go home. Only a handful of the team actually stays to complete May-Mester. Most fans think that after the Spring semester is over the players are done until fall camp in August but they are wrong. May-Mester is used by the players to get a leg up when it comes to graduation.

The three years I have been at Purdue I have participated in two May-Mesters and I can vouch and say that they are truly a challenge physically and mentally. It is a challenge physically because during this time the athletes who do stay have to wake up at 7:00 a.m. every morning to complete a grueling two hour long workout. It is challenging mentally because the class you take during this semester usually last two or three hours everyday and plus the work is accelerated due to the short semester.

“May-Mester is challenging but I love it because it gets you ready to dominate during the season,” said Purdue Wide Receiver Anthony Mahongou. ” The workouts the staff prepares for us is so challenging that it builds you into a man amongst boys.”

May-Mester

Purdue football traditions

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Purdue football has many of traditions one of those traditions that few outside of Purdue don’t know about is breakfast club. Breakfast club is an event before football games where students dress up in outrageous costumes and go to the local bars and hang out with their friends. Did I also mention that they do this at  5 a.m. in the morning until the start of the game? A few students even decide to wear there costumes out to the football game. The tradition of breakfast club is a fairly new tradition that was started in the late 1980’s by Pete’s bar and grill, now the West Lafayette Library. The idea of breakfast club was originally a marketing ploy to create interest in attending the bar on Saturday’s. After the bars success other bars followed suit thus creating a Purdue football season tradition.

Another Purdue football tradition before the start of the game is reciting the “I am an American” speech. This tradition came about in 1966 by Roy Johnson or known as “The Voice of Purdue”, this tradition truly didn’t become a well loved tradition by fellow Boilermakers until 11 days after the 9/11 attacks  during the home game against Akron. During the reciting of this speech one can see a huge American Flag on the field being held by service members and one can also hear the All-American Band of Purdue play the melody that goes along with the well loved speech. Soon after the speech is over the star spangled banner is played by the band.

“Even though it is a new tradition for Purdue I believe it may be one of the best because it reminds us of how blessed we truly are to be an American,” said Purdue safety Leroy Clark.

 

Purdue football traditions